War Memorials

The Memorials to the men from the village who fought and died in the two World Wars is located in the Parish Church of St. James, in the centre of the Village.

Our former Secretary, Steve Williams, started research into the names on the memorial in April 2002. It is still on-going, and now includes all the men with a Brindle connection who fought in WW1; all have been identified and their resting places located (where possible), and most of their graves and the cemeteries they lie in France, Belgium and Turkey have been visited and photographed (sites in Iraq, Burma, Tunisia and Bulgaria have yet to be visited; please contact us if visiting these countries).


 

World War 1

Fred BERRY, Private with the Royal Scots died in the Ypres Salient, Flanders on the 19th June 1917, aged 23 and is buried in Perth (China Wall) Cemetery, Zillebeke south of Ypres. He lived at Top o’th Lane with his widowed mother and sister, and worked at Withnell Fold Paper Mill.

Joseph FOWLER, Private with the 8th Bn. Loyal North Lancs. Regt. Killed in action on the 29th January 1917, aged 26. He is buried in Maple Leaf Cemetery, south of Ypres; his parents lived at Scale Hill Farm, Brindle.

Thomas GORTON, Private died of wounds on the 18th October 1918 whilst attached to the 2nd Bn. Guards Machine Gun Regiment. He died less than a month before the Armistice and is buried in grave at Premont British Cemetery, south east of Cambrai in northern France. His parents lived at Duxon Hill Farm, Brindle.

James H. HARTLEY

James H. HARTLEY

James H. HARTLEY, 2nd Lieutenant. Was an observer in 45 Squadron of the newly formed Royal Flying Corps when he was killed in action over Flanders on the 22nd July 1917. He was one of three brothers who served in the War and lived at Crabtree House in the village. He is buried at Ballieul Cemetery, near Ypres and was aged just 20; he previously served as an officer in the Munster Regiment.

James Foldys HITCHON

James Foldys HITCHON

James Foldys HITCHON, Lieutenant. Was attached to the 11th (Service) Bn. of the East Lancashire Regiment – the ‘Accrington Pals’. On the morning of the 1st July 1916 he led his platoon from ‘Y’ Company (‘Chorley Pals’) “over the top” at the Battle of the Somme; he was killed almost immediately and is buried virtually where he fell in No Man’s Land, near to the village of Serre in Northern France. Aged 21 when he died, he lived at Hoghton Bank, Private Road, Brindle (not Hoghton as stated) at the time of enlisting in 1914, although he was originally from Burnley. [Series of photographs in archives]

Samuel & Septimus HUNT

Samuel & Septimus HUNT

Samuel HUNT, Private with the 20th Bn. King’s (Liverpool Regiment) – the ‘Liverpool Pals’. Although he survived the first day of the Battle of the Somme, he died on the 30th July 1916 when the Regiment was virtually wiped out attacking the village of Guillement on the Somme battlefield. He was aged 25 and originally from Barrow-in-Furness; his brother, Septimus, also lost his life in the War.

Septimus HUNT, Bugler (Private) with the Cameronians, a Scottish Infantry Regiment. He died on the 13th October 1917 at the opening stages of the Battle of Paschendaele, attacking the Belgian village of Poelcapple where he is now buried in the CWGC Cemetery. He was aged 23 and originally from Barrow-in-Furness; his brother, Samuel, also lost his life in the War.

Both the Hunt brothers worked at Withnell Fold Paper Mill.

James IRELAND, Corporal with the Veterinary Corps. He died on the 29th November 1918 just after the war had ended and is buried in Brindle St. James’ Church graveyard close to his parent’s grave. He was 31 years of age, married and lived in Accrington, although prior to marrying he lived at Clayton-le Woods with his parents and worshipped at St. James’.

Albert E. PARKER, Private with the 3rd Bn. King’s Shropshire Light Infantry and died on the 29th November 1919, after the war had ended, aged 33. He is buried in Brindle St. James’ Church graveyard, in the grave of his mother Ann Calvert (nee Parker) and lived with his Aunt at Top o’th Lane at the time.

James W. PEARSON

James W. PEARSON

James W. PEARSON, Lance Corporal with the 1st Bn., the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. He was killed at the start of the War on the 14th September 1914 at the Battle of Aisne. He was 33 years of age, married and lived at Tyson Cottage, Top o’th Lane, Brindle; his father farmed locally. Two of his brothers also died in World War One and his son, Guardsman Frank Pearson, was killed in World War Two.

Richard PEARSON, Private emigrated from Brindle to New Zealand with his brother before the war and enlisted in the 2nd Bn., 3rd, N.Z. Rifle Brigade. He was killed in action in northern France on the 10th September 1918, aged 35; he is buried near Cambrai.

Thomas PEARSON, Private emigrated from Brindle to New Zealand with his brother before the war and enlisted in the 7th Bn., Wellington Regiment. Was killed in action in Flanders on the 10th July 1916, aged 24; he is buried near Armentieres. (The Service Records of both Richard and Thomas Pearson are in our archives, courtesy of the New Zealand Ministry of Defence).

John SHARPLES, Gunner with the Royal Field Artillery died on the 21st February 1917, aged 30. He is buried with his parents David and Eliza Sharples in the family grave in Brindle St. James’ Church graveyard; the Sharples family farmed locally.

Levi SHARPLES

Levi SHARPLES

Levi SHARPLES, Private with the 20th Bn., Manchester Regiment – the ‘Manchester Pals’ died on the 15th October 1917 in a hospital in Rouen, France from wounds, probably received at the 3rd Ypres (sometimes known as the Battle of Paschendaele) a few days earlier. He was aged 37, married; originally from Bolton Hall Farm, Hoghton.

Thomas WILSON

Thomas WILSON

Thomas WILSON, Guardsman with the 1st Bn., Coldstream Guards who was killed at the Battle of Cambrai on the 27th November 1917; he was aged 23 and has no known grave. His parents lived at Hill House Farm, Brindle. (A series of the two Wilson brothers who served in World War 1 are in the Archives).

William WORTHINGTON

William WORTHINGTON

William WORTHINGTON, Private with the 3rd Bn., King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He did not serve abroad as he was drowned on the 16th June 1915 when bathing in the North Sea off Hornsea. His body was washed up further down the coast a few days later and returned to the village for burial in the family plot in Brindle St. James’s churchyard. William was married and his parents lived in the centre of the village; both were active in the Parish Church (his father being the Sexton).

More detailed information and some photographs of the men are held in Brindle Historical Society archives.

Research using the ‘Soldiers who died in the Great War 1914-1918’ CD Rom revealed further names using the phrase “men who died who resided in Brindle at the time of enlisting” came up with four names not on any other lists…

George BARTON, Private

Jeremiah DECAUX, Sergeant F200120 1st/4th Bn. East Lancashire Regiment. Died of his wounds sustained during the 3rd Battle of Ypres on 13th October, 1917, aged 19; buried behind the lines at Zuydecoote, near Dunkirk. He was one of three brothers who lived at Sycamore Villas on Oram Road, Brindle and served in WW1.

Richard HUNTER

Richard HUNTER

Richard HUNTER, Private

Gordon PEARSON, Private

and using the phrase “men who died and claimed they were born in Brindle on their enlistment form”; showed five more names not on any other lists…

Henry FAZACKERLEY, Private

James PRESCOTT, Private

John RILEY, Lance Corporal MM

Albert TOWLER, Private

James WAREING, Private

On the 1918 Register of Electors for Brindle ‘Township’ it can be proven that two men on that list (roll), shown as “being absent on military service”, lost their lives during the war; they are…

George HUNTER, Private

John WILLIAMS, Private

and possibly, one other…

Thomas ROBERTS, Private

Details of these men are in the Brindle Historical Society archives.

Also, there are a number of CWGC (Commonwealth War Graves Commission) headstones in the graveyard of the Parish Church of St. James’ and similarly in the graveyard at St. Joseph’s R.C. Church at Chapel Fold, Brindle.

They are, at St. James…..

Kenneth CLITHERO

Kenneth CLITHERO

Kenneth CLITHERO, Sergeant (Pilot)

Frederick ELLIS, Lieutenant

Joseph SHARPLES

Joseph SHARPLES

Joseph SHARPLES, Private

and at St. Joseph’s…

M. KENNEDY, Staff Sgt.

J. RILEY, Private

Commemorated on family graves and headstones in St. James’ Church graveyard are the names of…

James Victor (‘Vic’) DEW, Sergeant (RAF)

James H. MARGROVE, Private

John William PARK, Private

Robert ROGERSON, Private

Edmund WOODS

Edmund WOODS

Edmund WOODS, Lieutenant

With the exception of Lt. Ellis (from Staffordshire), Sgt. Clithero and Sgt. Dew (both with local connections), the names are from World War One and details are held in Brindle Historical Society archives. Lt. Woods (pictured left) was killed in action at Gallipoli in 1915 serving with the East Lancashire Regiment.

Inside St. James’ Church there is a plaque to the memory of…

Francis A. JACQUES

Francis A. JACQUES

Francis A. JACQUES, Lt. Colonel

who “gallantly led a charge at Gallipoli in 1915”. He was the son of Rev. Canon Kinton Jacques, Rector of Brindle from 1889 to 1909. The Colonel served in the Indian Army and died at the head of his troops; he has no known grave.

The following men are commemorated on the War Memorial at St Joseph’s RC Church:

Joseph BURSCOUGH

Joseph BURSCOUGH

Joseph BURSCOUGH, Gunner (pictured left) L/13699 Royal Field Artillery (attached to Trench Mortar Battery). Died of his wounds at a field dressing station near Mametz on the Somme in northern France. He died on 26th July 1917 during the Battle of the Somme, which had started at the beginning of the month. He enlisted in April, 1915 and served most of his time around Vimy Ridge, Arras and on the Somme in France; he is buried in Flatiron Copse Cemetery, near Mametz on the Somme battlefield. He was aged 19 and worked on Hoghton Station and in the Goods Office; he lived with his parents in Hoghton Lane.

Joseph HORROCKS, Private 2019688 2nd / 4th Bn. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment was killed in action on 27th August, 1918 near Arras in northern France. He was aged 24 and is buried in a military cemetery in the small French village of Ecoust-St.Mein. He lived in Gregson Lane.

Arthur HOUGHTON, Guardsman 12928 2nd Bn. Scots Guards. Enlisted on 6th February, 1915 and died in King George’s Hospital, London hospital on 2nd November, 1915 from illness “contracted by drinking dirty water in a stream in France”; he was aged 22. Asked to buried at St. Joseph’s where he and his family worshipped, they lived at Coupe Green. Laid to rest in full military ceremony held in the church on 17th November conducted by the Very Rev. T Basil Feeny OSB and attended by the Sacred Heart Confraternity; he is buried in the churchyard in the family grave.

James HOUGHTON, Guardsman 14249 Coldstream Guards. Born in Longridge, he enlisted with his elder brother on 6th February, 1915. Died of wounds at a dressing station on the Ypres Salient in Belgium on 10th October, 1917, aged 21; wounded in the 3rd Battle of Ypres during early October, 1917. Buried in Dozingham Cemetery, south of Ypres.

Walter LOWE, Private 21278 7th Bn. East Lancashire Regiment. Born in Birmingham in 1897, his brother also served in WW1. He was killed in action on the Somme battlefield on 8th November, 1916 during the closing stages of the Battle of the Somme. He is buried in a front line cemetery in the middle of a field close to Grandcourt, near Thiepval.

Arthur LYON, Private 58116 2nd / 4th Bn. York & Lancaster Regiment was killed in action during the final advance on the 27th September, 1918 – less than 6 weeks before the end of WW1. He is buried in Grand Ravine Cemetery, Havrincourt close to Cambrai in northern France, after taking part in an attack on German lines on the Hindenburgh Line. He was just 18 years of age and lived at Bank Terrace in Hoghton.

Ambrose MARGINSON

Ambrose MARGINSON

Ambrose MARGINSON, Private 3368 1st / 4th Bn. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment was killed in action in northern France on 15th May, 1915 and has no known grave; he is commemorated on a memorial at Le Touret. Hoghton born, he was aged just 20 years of age when he died; he lived at Hoghton Hall in the village.

Robert WALMSLEY, Gunner 700782 Royal Field Artillery, killed in action during the 3rd Battle of Ypres. Born in Gregson Lane in 1883, he was aged 33 when he died on 21st October 1917; he is buried in Nine Elms Cemetery, near the Belgian town of Poperinghe.

Thomas WIDDOWSON

Thomas WIDDOWSON

Thomas WIDDOWSON, Sapper 120813 Royal Engineers, killed in action on 28th October, 1917 aged 31. Buried in Trois Abres military cemetery near Bailleul on the Belgium-French border; lived on Hoghton Lane.

John WITHRINGTON, (correct spelling WITHERINGTON) Bombadier 57859 Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action on 31st July, 1917 on the Ypres Salient, aged 26. Buried in Belgian Battery military cemetery near to the Belgian town of Ypres. Lived at 272 Hoghton Lane.

John WYNNE

John WYNNE

John WYNNE, Sergeant 5/3685, 5th Bn. Connaught Regiment. Born in Ballyglunin, County Galway in 1888. Enlisted in Dublin 1914, although educated at Preston College and worked at County Hall in Preston; lived at Crow Trees, next to Brindle Lodge, Brindle. Died of wounds on 20th August, 1915, aged 27, after action in the Gallipoli campaign; he is buried in the 7th Field Ambulance Cemetery on the Gallipoli Peninsula.


 

World War 2

Joseph H. BAXENDALE

Joseph H. BAXENDALE

Joseph H. BAXENDALE, Trooper with the Loyal North Lancs. Regiment. He was captured at Singapore in 1942 and died in Japanese hands on the Burma-Siam Railway on the 15th September 1943, aged 23; he is buried in the CWGC Cemetery in Thanbyuzayat, Burma. His parents ran the Cavendish Arms in the village during WW2.

Fred GREENWOOD, Private with the Pioneer Corps. Killed when the troopship ‘Lancastria’ was sunk off St. Nazaire in France on the 17th June 1940 with the loss of over 3,000 BEF troops; he was aged 43 and has no known grave.

Arnold HOLDING

Arnold HOLDING

Arnold HOLDING, Marine on board the cruiser HMS Charybdis that went down in the English Channel on the night of the 23rd October 1943; his body was washed ashore on the Brittany coast and is buried with other members of the ship’s company in Dinard British Cemetery, Dinard, France.

Frank PEARSON

Frank PEARSON

Frank PEARSON, Guardsman with the 2nd Bn. Grenadier Guards lost his life attacking German positions at Medjez-el-Bab in Tunisia, North Africa. He was 28 years of age at the time and is buried in the CWGC Cemetery close to the battlefield; his father L/Cpl James Pearson lost his life in World War One.

The following men are commemorated on the War Memorial at St Joseph’s RC Church:

Joseph GERRARD, Sergeant 1000145 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Serving as an Air Gunner with 178 Squadron, he was killed when the aircraft he was in was shot down over Hungary on a bombing raid on 14th October, 1944. He was 25 years of age and is buried in Budapest Military Cemetery; his parents lived in Hoghton.

William JACKSON, Corporal 995752 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died whilst serving in the U.K. on the 22nd November, 1944; he is buried in St. Joseph’s Churchyard.

John MORTON, Lieutenant 341132 East Lancashire Regiment. Died whilst on active service in the Far East, after the end of the Second World War, on the 18th February, 1946. He is buried with many of the men who died in Japanese hands on the Burma-Siam railway in a British War Graves Cemetery at Taukkan in Thailand. He was 23 years of age and his parents lived in Hoghton.

John SLATER

John SLATER

John SLATER, Trooper 10602553 61st Reconnaissance Corps, R.A.C. was killed in action on the 20th July, 1944 in the battle for the village of Tilley-sur-Seulles, south of Bayeux in Normandy, six weeks after the D-Day landings. He is buried in the British War Cemetery at Tilley; aged 21, he was the youngest of a local family from Gregson Lane.